Monthly Archives: April 2014

enable trackpad zoom in Firefox

Mozilla
With Firefox 29 just out, I’ve been testing it out as an alternative to Safari. However, if you’re new to Firefox you’ll probably find that the trackpad pinch and zoom gestures are not set by default. To turn them on, you’re going to need to do a bit of tinkering.

Open Firefox and type

about:config

in the address bar. Then type ‘browser.gesture’ in the search field and make the following changes to the ‘Value’ field for each of these preferences:

browser.gesture.pinch.in -> cmd_fullZoomReduce
browser.gesture.pinch.in.shift -> cmd_fullZoomReset
browser.gesture.pinch.out -> cmd_fullZoomEnlarge
browser.gesture.pinch.out.shift -> cmd_fullZoomReset
browser.gesture.pinch.latched -> false

Optionally you might want to also reduce the browser.gesture.pinch.threshold (I’ve got mine on 60).


Carbon Copy Cloner: see last back up date

CCC Last Backup Service

If you’re a user of Bombich Software’s excellent Carbon Copy Cloner but you’re not doing backups as scheduled tasks, you may wish there was a way to find out the last time you successfully completed a backup task.

Unfortunately, CCC doesn’t provide an easy way for users to see this information natively, but in this post we’re going to add it through a bit of AppleScript and Automator magic.

As it turns out, CCC does keep a log of all your past backup details stashed away in a CCC.log file buried in your local domain’s Library folder. You can view this file in Console, but it’s a bit of a pain. Wouldn’t it be nicer if you could just hit a hotkey like ‘Command-Control-C’, say (you know, for ‘CCC’ 🙂 ), and get a dialog box like this:

CCC Last Backup date
If you think so too, then download my Automator workflow:

For Lion, Mountain Lion and Mavericks:
Download for 10.7.5 thru 10.9.2 📀

For Snow Leopard:
Download for 10.6.8 💿

Double-click on the .zip file and double click again on the unzipped workflow file. You’ll get a warning message saying that you’ve downloaded the file from the internet (from me, actually!). After clicking ‘Open’ to dismiss the warning, for all users except 10.6, click ‘Install’ on the the following dialog box:

Install workflow

After clicking ‘Install’, click ‘Done’ to dismiss the confirmation dialog box that pops up.

For those of you running Snow Leopard (10.6.8), after clicking ‘Open’ the workflow should open in Automator. Hit ‘command-S’ to save it as a Service.

For all users, if you now click up to any application name next to the  Apple near the top left of your screen (see the screenshot at the top of this post) and scroll down to ‘Services’ you should see the new Service already there. If you don’t, try logging out and logging back in to your user account.

Once you can see the workflow in the Services menu, go ahead and give it a click to test it out. 🙂

A couple of notes on usage:

Carbon Copy Cloner does not have to be open for the Service to work.

The date format display is YYYY-MM-DD.

If you want to add a shortcut key as suggested earlier, open up System Preferences > Keyboard and click the ‘Shortcuts’ tab. Down the sidebar you should see ‘Services’. Click on that and scroll way down to the bottom till you see the name of the Service. Click ‘Add Shortcut’ and hit the keys you want to use. I like ‘command-control-C’ as it’s an easy mnemonic for ‘Carbon-Copy-Cloner’.

how to clear Safari’s cookies on quit

If ever there was a free app that deserved more recognition, it’s Safari Cleaner (direct download). Developed out of a simple applescript, this app does what many people would expect Safari to have an option to do in the Preferences panels: automatically clear stored information when Safari quits.

Personally, I’ve found this particularly needsome since signing into any Google service seems to be particularly irritating. Gmail, for example, needs several clicks just to be told that you don’t want to be remembered. Safari Cleaner takes care of automatically ‘forgetting’ as much or as little info as you want without you having to remember to clear cookies or caches. It’ll also, thankfully, forget Top Sites. 🙂

Safari Cleaner

Personally, I leave my history as that’s something I regularly need across sessions, but the rest, I’m happy to be forgotten. If you’re wondering why anyone might care, well, there’s a whole bunch of reasons including protecting you from malware and malicious websites, but at least one other is nicely detailed in this Ars Technica article, which explains how cookies can be used to track your physical whereabouts.

One caveat to note with Safari Cleaner: in my tests, I’ve noticed that if you click and restart Safari in rapid succession (within about 5 seconds or less), the script hasn’t had time to complete running and caches and cookies aren’t cleared. To be safe, you probably want a nice 10 secs or so between quitting and relaunching Safari if you absolutely must be sure the previous session was wiped out.

Once you’ve run and set up Safari Cleaner’s options, you can quit the app and it’ll just carry on working in the background. Launch the app only if you want to change your options. If you want to uninstall it, note that there’s an uninstaller in the DMG, so don’t throw that away.

Get Safari Cleaner (direct download)

 

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