Category Archives: AppleScript

BBEdit: how to preview Slack messages





I’ve been using Slack quite a bit recently, but I’m still not that confident with its text formatting options. Sure, they’re simple enough, but when I’m on a workspace with a 10-minute editing timeout and I’ve a heavily formatted message to send, there’s plenty of chance I might not get the formatting just the way I want in time.

That got me to thinking there must be an editor that supports Slack’s style of markdown, but I was surprised to see from Slack’s help that in fact, they don’t support regular markdown at all:



Hmm, that’s a bit disappointing. What to do?

Well, turn to my two favourite apps, BBEdit and Script Debugger, and knock up my own preview editor, of course!

This only works if you have access to BBEdit’s advanced features (either you’re still on the trial or you bought a license) as you’ll need the Markup menu and its ‘Preview in BBEdit’ option (Control-Command-P) for this to work.

To use the script, save it (or an alias to it) in BBEdit’s Scripts folder as ‘Slack Preview.scpt’ and assign it a shortcut key in BBEdit’s Preferences:







You’ll find the script available in the menu bar, but it’s going to be more convenient to use the keyboard shortcut. You may also need to muscle-memory the shortcut for opening the Preview window (Control-Command-P) if it isn’t open already when you run the script.





The script will prompt you if that happens:

Finally, here’s a little 1-minute video showing the script in action. You’ll note from the screenshot at the top of this post that I’ve improved the styling a bit since the video was made to more closely emulate the default Slack style, but those of you with better CSS skills than I are welcome to fiddle with that to suit your taste.



So what are you waiting for? Oh, you missed the link to the script? Here you go, then.

Enjoy! 😀


BBEdit: remove whitespace with one click

remove whitespace

I often need to process lists of ‘dirty text’ which can contain lots of whitespace, new lines and so on. Fortunately, BBEdit allows you to run AppleScripts directly from its Script menu, which means we can define lots of useful little text processing scripts and have them ready to hand. I’ve got several that I’ll share over the next few posts, but probably the most oft-used of them is this one for removing whitespace.

Here’s what the script looks like. You can download the source from my pastebin here.

And here’s a little giffy showing it at work:






Share and enjoy! 🙂


how to easily spoof a user’s password





Spoofing or phishing – presenting a user with fake authentication requests – is a common email tactic, but it’s not the only vector where you need to be on your guard. Every version of macOS is vulnerable to a very simple phishing attack right on your desktop that doesn’t require admin privileges to run, would not be detected by GateKeeper or XProtect, and which could easily be placed on your mac by any of the nefarious malware / adware installer scripts that come with some less reputable software downloads.

This attack isn’t new, but it’s not often talked about. The easiest way to see how it works is in this quick 4-minute demo:

As you can see, it’s easy to grab the icon of any Application and put it in the script; it doesn’t even have to be the icon of an app that’s running. The simple demo I gave above could easily launch iTunes first to increase the coherence of the attack, or it could use a completely different icon, including the icon of security programs you may have running on your mac.

How can you check?

If you were presented with a password request like this and wanted to check whether it’s legitimate or not, an easy way would be to use my free utility DetectX Swift’s Profiler. Click the Profiler function, and search for ‘osascript’ within the Running Processes section. Note how DetectX Swift shows you the text of the script being run, confirming that this dialog is up to no good:


how to retrieve forgotten Wifi password


At our house, giving visitors the wifi password is always an exercise in frustration. Can’t remember? Oh, then I’ve got to either go trawling through Keychain Access or log in to the router, neither of which are particularly appealing.

Here’s an easier way. It’ll require an admin password (and you’ll need to supply it for as many passwords as you’re looking for – no ‘with administrator privileges’ will help here I’m afraid), but otherwise requires nothing more than a quick double-click of this saved script, once you’ve added your own SSID names in place of the dummy ones.

Just to be clear, you do NOT need to add the passwords to the script. So long as the mac that you run this script on already knows the Wifi password, the script will retrieve it.

Get the script from my pastebin

Enjoy!

how to quickly toggle Swift Compiler warnings





I thought I’d share this little AppleScript for anyone working with Xcode 8.3.3 and using Swift.

One of the things I find intrusive are the constant Swift Compiler warnings while I’m actually in the middle of writing a block of code (e.g, ‘…value was never used consider replacing…’). Well, yeah, it’s not been used *yet* …grrr!

However, turning off compiler warnings isn’t something I want to do either. It’s too easy to go into the build settings, turn them off, do a bit of coding, take a break, do a bit more coding…oh, three thousand lines later and I suddenly realize why Xcode hasn’t been correcting my mistakes all afternoon!

This script allows you to quickly and easily toggle the warnings from a hotkey, and just gives you a gentle reminder as to what you’ve done. Of course that won’t stop you forgetting, but assigning a hotkey for this script makes it painless to just turn warnings off and back on again as soon as you’ve got past whatever bit of code the compiler was complaining about.


Xcode unfortunately doesn’t have its own scripts menu, so in order to assign the script a hotkey, you’ll need to either make it into a Service with Automator or use a script runner like Red Sweater’s FastScripts.

#start
on sendNotification(aVal)

display notification "Suppress Warnings was set to " & aVal with title "Swift Compiler - Warnings Policies"

end sendNotification

tell application id "com.apple.dt.Xcode"
tell its front document
tell its front project
tell its front target
tell its build configuration "Debug"
set b to build setting "SWIFT_SUPPRESS_WARNINGS"
if b's value is "NO" then
set b's value to "YES"
else
set b's value to "NO"
end if
my sendNotification(b's value)
end tell
end tell
end tell
end tell
end tell
#EOF

If copying the code above doesn’t build, get the raw source from my pastebin here. Here’s how it looks in Script Debugger 6:

Enjoy! 🙂


how to tell if your mac is too hot





The sound of the fans spinning up on your mac is never a welcome noise, but it’s usually completely normal. Determining the fan speed without 3rd party software isn’t easy, but not impossible:

do shell script "SD=~/.spindump.txt; rm $SD; spindump 1 1 -file $SD; grep 'Fan speed' $SD; rm $SD" with administrator privileges



Copy and paste the above into your (Apple)Script Editor and run it. You’ll need an Adminstrator password.





However, that doesn’t really tell you what you want to know: is my mac too hot or not? Should I do something about it?

Fortunately, we can get a better idea of the mac’s thermal state (and we don’t need admin privs to do it!), with this script:



The script not only reports the mac’s thermal state, but prints out Apple’s recommended advice, if any. Uncomment the last line of the script to get the result in a display dialog box; otherwise, you can just read the result in the results pane of your script editor.

Enjoy! 🙂


Featured Image: Flicker

BackupCam – a dash cam for your mac





The initial release of BackupCam has just gone live over on sqwarq.com.

The idea behind BackupCam is to keep a continuous, rolling video of the last few minutes of activity on your mac, in just the same way as dash cams in cars work.

There’s a couple of scenarios where this might be useful. If you’re working on a project where ‘undo’ doesn’t always work reliably or when you most need it to – Xcode, for example, can often let you get your project in a mess without offering you a clear path as to how you got there or how to get back, short of discarding all changes in a particular file – with BackupCam you’ll be able to see exactly how you got to where you are.

Similarly, BackupCam can also help you to review changes that you may not have noticed at the time – perhaps if you were distracted by something else happening, either on screen or off. This can help both as a security and a troubleshooting tool

BackupCam can record up to the previous 30 minutes activity, so may help you recover something that is missed even by Time Machine or other traditional file backup mechanism.

More details are over on the BackupCam webpage, but I’ll just note here that BackupCam can also be controlled by AppleScript, with all the flexibility that that offers. Here’s a sample script that checks whether the last recording was longer ago than the time interval set in BackupCam. If it is, it kicks off a new recording session:






BackupCam is still in the early stages of development (we’re calling v1 a beta), so please feel free to report any bugs or enhancments you’d like to see. At the moment, it requires 10.11.6 or higher and only records the main display. I plan to add support for multiple displays in a future update.

how to script with Objective-C



Is it me, or is AppleScript experiencing something of an Indian Summer? It seems everywhere I go, people are talking more about macOS automation, AppleScript and even Apple’s curious hybrid syntax AppleScriptObjC (ASObjC).

Of course, some people have suffered miserably at the hands of AppleScript in the past, and even though the thought of scripting with access to Cocoa APIs through Objective-C is tempting, they fear the AppleScript side of it.

If that’s you, bear in mind that AppleScriptObjC isn’t really “AppleScript + Objective-C” at all. It is actually just a dialect of Objective-C that will be accepted in the (Apple)Script Editor and can be run by an instance of the AppleScript component. In plainer English, you can use Objective-C in an AppleScript without any AppleScript whatsoever!

The point of doing so would be that one could package Objective-C code in a .scpt file (or scptd bundle or AppleScript .app), and also mix whatever scripting language you prefer with calls to Cocoa’s APIs.*

The problem that using ASObjC presents anyone familiar with Objective-C is how to translate ‘pure’ Objective-C into the dialect that Script Editor (and other applescript runners like FastScripts, Keyboard Maestro, Automator, etc) can understand. If you use LateNight Software’s Script Debugger for scripting, you’ll already know that the work is done for you by the app’s built-in code completion. If you’re battling on in Apple’s default Script Editor, you’ll need to do the translation manually.

By way of example, then, here’s some original Objective-C, and below it, a translation that would work in Script Editor:

Objective C
NSString *aString = @"hello";
NSString *bString = @" world";

aString = [aString stringByAppendingString:bString];

NSUserNotification *notif = [[NSUserNotification alloc] init];
notif.informativeText = aString;
[[NSUserNotificationCenter defaultUserNotificationCenter] deliverNotification:notif];


AppleScriptObjC
set aString to NSString's stringWithString:"hello"
set bString to NSString's stringWithString:" world"

set aString to aString's stringByAppendingString:bString

set notif to NSUserNotification's alloc's init
set notif's informativeText to aString
NSUserNotificationCenter's defaultUserNotificationCenter()'s deliverNotification:notif


As you can see, there’s a direct 1-to-1 correspondence, with the 6 statements in Objective-C paralleled by the 6 statements in AppleScriptObjC.

The main peculiarity is the use of possessive word forms and that variable attribution is done by using "set X to Y" rather than "X = Y". Type declaration is done via the idiom 'set <var> to <NSObject>'s <class init method>', which returns an instance of the object just as it would normally. You call instance methods by putting the instance in front of the method just as you would in regular Objective-C (e.g, see line 3 of the examples).

As you can see in the screenshot below showing Xcode and Script Editor, they work in the same way. You’ll notice in Script Editor there is a 'use' statement (equivalent to Objective-C’s ‘import’), and there’s also a whole load of property statements. These latter are peculiar to the ASObjC translation, and don’t have a counterpart in pure Objective-C. All you need to know about these is for each kind of Objective-C object you want to use (NSString, NSArray, whatever*), you’ll want a property statement for it at the beginning of the script. The statement always has the same form:

property <NSObject> : a reference to current application's < NSObject>

I think the best way to think of ASObjC was recently summed up by Sal Saghoian, when he said that ASObjC is “…the ultimate duct tape. You can do anything you want with ASObjC. You own the computer.”

Enjoy! 🙂

*not all Cocoa frameworks nor all Objective-C objects can be bridged to, but pretty much all the most useful ones are available.



Further reading:

– Applehelpwriter’s review of Script Debugger 6
how to quickly toggle Swift Compiler warnings



Picture credits: Top image adapted from MilleniumBirdge by lesogard

get automated with Hammerspoon

I recently discovered a neat little extra automation tool on top of the familiar ones of AppleScript, Automator, and script runners like FastScripts and Keyboard Maestro. Meet Hammerspoon, which differs significantly in not using Apple Events to do many of its automation tasks. Instead, Hammerspoon bridges directly to Apple APIs using the lua scripting language, and that allows you to do some interesting things.

Here’s a good example. One of the ‘danger zones’ on your mac – by which I mean one of the favourite places for adware, malware and other assorted badwares to infect – is your LaunchAgents folders. Apps like my DetectX and FastTasks 2 keep an eye on these areas by design, warning you in the Changes and History logs when files have been added or removed from them – but Hammerspoon can add an extra little ‘canary’ warning for you too. With only a few lines of code in Hammerspoon’s config file, you can set up an alert that will fire whenever the LaunchAgents folder is modified.

It has been possible to rig up something similar for a long time with Apple’s built-in Folder Actions, but there’s a couple of reasons why I prefer Hammerspoon for this task. One, despite Apple’s attempt to improve Folder Actions’ reliability, I’m still not convinced. I get inconsistent reports when asking System Events to check whether Folder Actions is enabled even on 10.11 and 10.12. Second, Folder Actions is limited in what it will respond to. By default, only if an item is added. With a bit of effort, you can rig it up to watch for items deleted, too, but that’s pretty much it. With Hammerspoon, it’ll alert you whenever the folder or its contents are modified in any way whatsoever. The final reason for preferring Hammerspoon for this particular task is ease of use. It really is as simple as pasting this code into the config file:


function myFolderWatch()
hs.alert.show("Launch Agents folder was modified")
end

function canaryFolderWatch()
hs.alert.show("Canary folder was modified")
end
local aWatcher = hs.pathwatcher.new(os.getenv("HOME") .. "/Library/LaunchAgents/", myFolderWatch):start()
local bWatcher = hs.pathwatcher.new(os.getenv("HOME") .. "/_Acanary/", canaryFolderWatch):start()

And what’s the config file you ask? Nothing complicated! Just launch Hammerspoon, click its icon and choose ‘open config’.

That will launch your default text editor, and all you do is paste your code into there, save it (no need to tell it where, Hammerspoon already knows) and then go back to the Hammerspoon icon and click ‘Reload config’. That’s it. Less than a minute’s work!

There’s a lot, lot more you can do with Hammerspoon, so if you’re interested head off and check out the Getting Started guide. One of the nice things is that you can even call AppleScripts with it, so you really do have a world of automation options to choose from!

how to tell if iCloud Drive is up-to-date

icloud daemon status script
I tend to work on the iMac at home, then take an MBP to work. Several times I’ve thought iCloud had uploaded what I had been working on at home before I left, only to find that when I got to work, the old version was still the latest one on iCloud. Of course, I checked for the spinning little progress indicator, but apparently I either missed it or it didn’t appear.

To mitigate this problem, I came up with this script to tell me what iCloud daemon is doing. If files are pending update or being updated, it will indicate which ones. It will also tell me if the iCloud daemon is either idle or busy / not responding.

Get the iCloud Daemon Script from my pastebin

Enjoy! 🙂

%d bloggers like this: