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scan for malware on the command line

Screen Shot 2017-12-20 at 19.23.50


DetectX Swift now has the ability to do command line searches for issues on your mac like malware, keyloggers, browser hijacks and potentially dangerous software, and there’s a number of extra options that are not available when using the user interface. In this post, I’m going to give you a quick tour of the CLI (Command Line Interface) tool with some examples of how to use it (if you haven’t yet grabbed a free copy of DetectX Swift you might want to do that first to play along).

1. Basic scan
Let’s start with a basic scan. To use the CLI search, you need to specify the full path to the app executable. In this example, let’s suppose that the app is in /Applications folder. In that case, you’d need to execute this on the command line:

/Applications/DetectX\ Swift.app/Contents/MacOS/DetectX\ Swift search

Since that’s a bit of a handful, even using tab completion, you might want to edit your .bash_profile to include a shortcut alias. Here’s mine:

sphil@sphils-iMac-5:~$ cat .bash_profile

alias sudo='sudo '

alias detectx='/Applications/DetectX\ Swift.app/Contents/MacOS/DetectX\ Swift'

Note the sudo line (and note the extra space in the value). We’re going to need that so that we can pass the alias to sudo when we want to pass certain options to the search. Like…

2. Scan other users
Probably the most important benefit you gain with scanning on the command line rather than from the app’s interface is the ability to scan all, or selected, other users. You can search all users by using sudo and the -a option:

sudo detectx search -a

If you want to restrict the search to one or more users, the -u option allows you to specify a list of shortuser names (comma-delimited):

sudo detectx search -u alice,bob

3. Go deep
If you’d like more verbose output, including how long the search took, try either the vsearch or vvvv commands:

sudo detectx vvvv -a

4. Save the results
You can specify a path to output the results, either in regular text:

sudo detectx vvvv -a ~/Desktop/searchtest.txt

or, by passing the extra -j option, in JSON format:

sudo detectx search -aj ~/Desktop/searchtest.json

Here’s an example of what the formatted JSON file looks like:

Screen Shot 2017-12-20 at 18.05.26

5. Anything else?
There’s a help command that will output the documentation to the command line, and also if you get into the habit of regularly running command line checks, don’t forget to launch the app from time to time in the Finder. Like its predecessor, DetectX, DetectX Swift does a lot of other stuff besides searching that can help track down and remediate problems with your mac, and a large part of that revolves around the way it tracks changes to your system every time you launch it. The CLI tool runs independently of that and won’t give you that kind of feedback or record those changes.

Finally, note that in the release version of DetectX Swift, the CLI tool is only available for a limited period to Home and Unregistered users. Unlimited acccess to the CLI tool requires a Pro or Management license.

Enjoy! 🙂


news: DetectX v2.14 released

Screen Shot 2016-02-14 at 23.03.29

Yes, two in two days! We’ve added a Preference Pane since yesterday, and improved the performance of the search function. Note that the new Sparkle Vulnerability check we introduced in v2.13 is now off by default. It can be turned on from the Preference Pane (see above).

Other changes are listed in the release notes.

DetectX is still free, fully-functional, and without time-limit for home users. Available for download from here.

🙂

 

how Keyloggers get around OS X security

Elite instal

With the release of Elite Keylogger Version 1.7.327, we’ve noticed some unexpected changes to how the developers are installing and hiding their work.

Let’s take a quick look at what happens when you install the free demo of this keylogger. First, you’ll notice that the app isn’t codesigned and requires you to override any GateKeeper settings.

Screen Shot 2015-11-16 at 17.15.52

Secondly, it’ll ask you for your admin password to escalate its privileges so it can write to wherever it wants in the system. So far nothing new. But here’s where the new release gets interesting.

What it does next is automagically insert itself into System Preferences/Security & Privacy/Privacy/Accessibility without throwing the required authorisation dialogue:

Screen Shot 2015-11-16 at 17.20.27

Forcing apps to be in this list if they want to leverage System Events to control a computer was a change brought in with OS X Lion 10.7, and it isn’t supposed to be circumventable.

The idea was that to get in this list, apps were forced to throw an authorisation dialog to get the user’s permission, even if the user had already given the app admin privileges elsewhere.

Unofficially, we’ve heard that Apple had once promised to crackdown on developers who tried to circumvent this security feature and to close any gaps that were exposed. As it is, we’ve not only been aware of a way around this security feature since late 2013, but it seems it’s not just the less reputable that are at it. Dropbox has been inserting itself into the Accessibility list since at least 10.10.5, without asking for permissions (in our screenshot, we never authorised either of these apps to be in this list, nor did we ever unlock the padlock to let them in).

The way that Elite Keylogger does this is through a sql database insertion, you can see the code they use here:

sql insertion

Another interesting development is that Elite’s developers, widestep, are now leveraging a hidden binary called FScript64 that is placed and hidden with the chflags -hidden flag set here:

/Library/ScriptingAdditions/FScript64.osax

We first saw this binary used in Refog’s Hoverwatch keylogger, but this is the first time we’ve seen the same code shared with other keyloggers. We can only speculate as to why developers from apparently-competing products are sharing code.

A couple of other things to note with Elite: If you drag the app to the Trash, the secret FScript64.osax will be left behind. If you use the uninstaller, the hidden binary will be removed, but another hidden data file will be placed here:

~/.ek

Our troubleshooting app DetectX already knows about both of these files, so if you want to check whether you’ve got rid of both of these or have other keylogger files present, download a free copy from sqwarq.com.

DetectX registers the addition of Elite Keylogger

DetectX registers the addition of Elite Keylogger

Finally, note that even if you use Elite Keylogger’s uninstaller, the app will remain in the list of Accessibility apps and it will remain in your list of login items. You’ll need to manually remove them both, and the hidden .ek file AND the osax if you didn’t use the uninstaller or didn’t use DetectX to help you remove the crud.

As always, be careful about what you download, use apps like DetectX or FastTasks 2 that can log changes that downloaded apps make to your system, and beware of all apps that require your admin password in order to be installed. There are legitimate reasons for that in some cases, but not many.

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