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applescript: how to rant on Twitter

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Well, hopefully you won’t…but if you wanted to post something longer than the 142 character limit without manually having to break it all up, this script will do it for you.

All you do is set the ‘tweetRant’ variable to whatever missive of massive importance you want to convey, and run the script. It’ll break your text into tweet-sized strings, add ellipses to them where appropriate and post them in 10-second intervals.

Of course, using this for spamming would likely not win you many friends…and besides, it’s not the only way to abuse Twitter’s 142 rule.:p

A more responsible use would be to adapt this script to create your own kind of Buffer service. You’d need to add scheduling via Calendar or a launch agent to do that, a subject we’ll tackle in an upcoming post.

Download the script from my pastebin…

Enjoy! 🙂

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run Terminal commands from any app

In this post I’m going to show you how you can select a piece of text in any app and have it run in Terminal simply by hitting a hotkey. The trick is especially useful for running commands you find on websites (like this one!) in a browser like Safari or Firefox.

This 20-second clip demonstrates running a command from a Firefox browser and another one from TextEdit, but you can also do it from an AppleScript editor window (and indeed any app that has selectable text), which can be useful for testing the formatting of your ‘do shell script’ commands and the like:






The first thing you’re going to need is to create an Automator workflow, add an AppleScript action and insert some code. Really? Nah, just kidding. I did it for you. 🙂 Just download, unzip and double-click the .workflow file to install the completed Service:

Download Run in Terminal.workflow.zip

Click through the various dialog boxes and choose ‘Install’ on the last one* (note for Snow Leopard users: the service will open directly in Automator; just do ‘command-shift-S’ to name it and save it).

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All you need to do now is set the hotkey. Open  > System Preferences.. > Keyboard | Shortcuts and click ‘Services’ in the sidebar. Scroll down the window till you see the ‘Run in Terminal’ command. Click on the far right to add a shortcut of your choice. The one I used in the video is ‘command-option-control-T’ (‘T’ for ‘Terminal’ helps me remember the shortcut).

To use the Service, just highlight any Terminal command by triple clicking it and pressing your hotkey. Try this one,

cd ~/Desktop; ls -alF

which lists all the visible and invisible files on your Desktop, as a test.

You can also get to the Service from both the contextual menu (right-click > Services) and the application menu bar at the top (e.g., Safari > Services).

As a bonus, try out your new Service on the Terminal command in this post, and now you’ll be able to run Terminal commands even from Quick Look previews in Finder!

Enjoy! 🙂


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